Fairway Woods

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Choosing Fairway Woods

A typical set of golf clubs would include a 3 wood (15 degree loft) and a 5 wood (18 degree loft).  We hardly do anything traditional anymore for a couple of reasons.  If we fit you into a 12 or 13 degree driver, we would likely put you into a 16.5 or 17 degree 4 wood as your next club because you may have difficulty in getting a standard 3 wood in the air.  This added loft would give you more distance as well.  The next club in your bag would likely be a 7 wood (21 degree loft) or a 3 Hybrid (20 degree loft).  A similar scenario could apply if you hit your driver a long ways and find yourself hitting your 3 wood too far on par 5’s and 5 wood not long enough.  The perfect choice would be a 4 wood and drop the 3 and 5 wood.  Because lofts are also a measure of how high you will hit the ball for a given swing speed, we really work hard to give you the proper distance gaps with your fairway woods by choosing the proper wood lofts.

Depending upon the types of courses you play and the tightness of the fairways, you may want to consider a strong 3 wood (13 degree, also called a 3+) so you have a longer club off the tee if fairways are tight. Most professional golfers use a driver, 3+ and 5 wood or go the other way with a driver, 4 wood (16 degree) and 7 wood (21 to 24 degree). This gives you more options off the tee and off the fairway.

Why YOU Need New Fairway Woods

OK, let’s be honest.  You probably have at least one driver that you purchased in the last year or two.  More than likely, it is white, right?  But when was the last time you purchased a new fairway wood….and one that actually worked for you?  Let’s talk about the two issues that need to be addressed before you can hit your fairway woods the way you should.

First, most fairway woods have shafts that are too light and too flexible.  Each manufacturer decides which shaft weight they will use in their fairways woods and they are usually too light as compared to your driver.  The standard weight differential from driver to fairway wood is 10 grams.  So if you are playing a 65 gram driver, your fairway woods should be 75 grams.   Shaft flex is also an issue.  Most fairway wood shafts that are marked S (stiff) flex will actually play much softer flex due to the weight of the fairway wood head.   What this means is that your consistency of ball striking, accuracy and distance are being compromised.  All is not lost, however.  With a proper fitting you can actually change shafts and get much better performance out of your existing fairway woods.

The second reason you should look at new fairway woods is the new designs from TaylorMade and other manufacturers.  Research by TaylorMade has shown that the average male golfer has too low of launch angle and creates too much spin to optimize distance with his fairway woods.  Most golfers hit their fairway woods with a descending blow (negative attack angle), and hit the ball below the center of gravity of the club face.  These two factors alone create a tremendous amount of spin that reduces distance. The new designs have moved the center of gravity to create a higher launching trajectory.  And, the slot designs have created more trampoline effect so these heads are actually hotter, and still within the COR guidelinies of the USGA.   

Now, to have the absolute best performance, you should not only embrace the new head designs but get properly fit for the shaft that matches your swing.  Then you will have the best of ALL worlds…Distance, Consistency and Accuracy.

 

Your call on the RBZ 3HL and the shaft was perfect!  Almost as long as my driver.  You are the BEST! -David W., Washington, DC (July, 2012)


TAYLORMADE

 

“Forgiveness comes in multiple forms. First, the sole’s V-shape and rounded leading edge limit friction with the turf. That means you’ll lose less clubhead speed coming into the ball. Second, the face’s asymmetrical curvatures help off-center strikes curve back to the target. Finally, with their larger size, there’s ample perimeter weighting to manage misses. The Max D is designed to combat slices.” –TaylorMade Golf

 

 

 


CALLAWAY

“The right fairway wood isn’t one size fits all. That’s why Callaway offers 16 fairway woods accounting for multiple lofts across three head styles. The Mavrik’s low-spin and maximum-forgiveness models differ not only in loft and shape, but in intended ball flight, forgiveness and spin. That individual attention extends to the face design, which has variable-thickness conceived through artificial intelligence and contoured for each head style and loft. ” –Callaway Golf

 

 

 


TITLEIST

“Like the TS drivers, these woods are thinner in the crown, so there’s more weight low to help launch shots higher and farther. A thin, high-strength steel face insert reduces weight and provides flex upfront. Titleist repositions that mass for forgiveness in the TS2 and adjustability in the TS3’s sole cartridge. A deeper channel cut through the sole amps up ball speed”

– Titleist Golf

 

 

 


PXG

“For some golfers, the challenge isn’t launching a fairway wood, it’s reducing spin so the ball spends more energy going forward than up. These models use mass saved from a carbon-composite crown in an internal weight pad closer to the face to produce a low center of gravity for less spin. The movable weights in the sole let you add forgiveness or dial in a draw or fade.” – PXG