What's New: Fitting Tips

Better Golf Starts With A Clubfitting and Clubs Built to Your Specifications

January 8th, 2018

Better Golf Starts With a Clubfitting and Clubs Built to Your Specifications. I know we have been saying this since we started the company in 1997, but it is even more true today.  Why?  Because there have been so many improvements in both golf equipment and fitting technology that you cannot help but get the right equipment in your bag.  But, you need to get fit and get clubs built by experts that know what is critical to your success.  Here is what it takes: A Consistent Fitting Formula: A lot of clubfitters are trained by a particular company (or three) and have a set of fitting guidelines that are very narrow in scope.  By that I mean they use only a few fitting parameters like swing speed or distance to determine club weight, length, etc.  To be honest, when we started our business, there was no real consistent formula for fitting either.  We took some great information provided by Tom Wishon and then blazed our own trail with our BGF Fitting System.  We can now take golfer physical characteristics (height, weight, wrist crease-to-floor), swing dynamics (tempo, transition, release point), strength (swing speed, distance), launch conditions (launch angle, spin, shot... Read More

Golf Swing Dynamics That Affect Shaft Selection

December 21st, 2017

Golf Swing Dynamics That Affect Shaft Selection. Every golfer has a unique swing, right?  All you have to do is look down the line of golfers on the driving range and you will see every swing imaginable.  Go back in time and look at golfers that have been extremely successful on PGA, LPGA and Champions Tours.  Players like Lee Trevino, Anika Sorenstam, and Bernhard Langer each show dramatically different golf swing dynamics.  (See our blog on Seven Unique Shaft Loading Profiles here…). I am talking about the major biomechanical moves that truly affect how the golf club reacts during your swing.  Those are Tempo, Transition, and Release.  What is very interesting is that these biomechanical traits are very difficult to modifiy .  So trying to “slow down” your swing may last for a hole or two, but it is better to build golf clubs that match your style rather than changing your swing to match your clubs.  If you want to improve accuracy, distance and consistency, you MUST have clubs that match your unique swing dynamics. First let’s explain these key swing dynamics and then let’s talk about how each of them individually and then collectively affect the shafts that will give you optimum performance.  (See... Read More

The Right Shaft Can Get You More Distance Off the Tee

December 14th, 2017

The Right Shaft Can Get You More Distance Off the Tee. Over 20 years of fitting golfers, one of the most critical fitting criteria is getting the correct shaft for your swing for getting more distance off the tee.  The biggest result of an improperly fit shaft is loss of distance, followed by lack of consistency.  If you do not have the proper length, weight, flex, tip and butt profile, swing weight and feel, you will be inconsistent with your driver results and miss-hit a lot of shots.  By using both your static measurements and dynamic swing data, a good fitter should be able to immediately predict a good starting point for shaft length, weight, flex and launch characteristics (See our BGF Fitting System).  From there, you need to give feedback to the fitter in terms of feel (weight, stiffness, shaft release).  Let’s look at the four critical shaft factors in getting more distance off the tee. First, let’s talk about shaft weight.  Driver shafts are typically graphite and come stock from manufacturers in 35 to 75 gram weights.  A club fitter can fit you in any of those weights and even heavier if needed.  The old saying of “hit the lightest,... Read More

Get More Driver Distance With a Positive Angle of Attack

December 7th, 2017

Get More Driver Distance With a Positive Angle of Attack. Attack angle is the angle at which your club is either descending into the ball (negative attack angle) or ascending into the ball (positive attack angle) at impact.  I have been harping on this for a couple of years but this is definitely a way that most of you can dramatically improve your distance!  There are several reasons for this. Increased Launch Angle and Lower Spin First, by having a positive attack angle, you increase the launch angle of the club you are using which in turn promotes a higher ball flight for more carry.  Second, the positive attack angle reduces the spin rate coming off the club face which reduces drag and increases carry AND roll.  Conversely, a negative attack angle imparts more backspin on the ball and results in a lower launch angle.  This increases drag, reduces carry AND roll.  It is always good to have a ball flight monitor (TrackMan, FlightScope, Foresight with HMT) to measure your attack angle, but here are a couple of easy ways to tell if your attack angle is positive or negative.  Let’s say you have a 10.5 degree driver and your... Read More

Optimize Driver Loft for More DIstance

November 30th, 2017

Optimize YOUR Driver Loft for More Distance. In the previous segment of this blog, we discussed hitting the ball on the sweet spot in order to optimize your “smash factor” or efficiency.  In general, this will be a spot that is slightly towards the toe and just above the center of the clubface.  Remember, to maximize distance, it is a combination of ball speed, launch angle and spin rate.  In this segment, we are going to talk about the optimum launch angle for your club speed.  Launch angle is determined by several factors: Club loft Angle of Attack Impact point on the clubface Forward lean of the shaft Club Loft In general, the slower the swing or club speed, the higher the loft of the driver to optimize both carry and roll.  Most drivers come in degrees of loft from 8.5 to 16.  Long Drive competitors have drivers that have only 4 to 7.5 degrees of loft.  This is because at higher ball speeds, there is considerably more lift created which allows the ball to climb rapidly after impact.   Let’s assume for now that you have a 100 mph club speed and your driver launch is 10.0 degrees, as shown... Read More

Don’t Buy Your New Driver Off The Rack

November 27th, 2017

Don’t buy your new driver off the rack!  We have been saying this for years.  Why?  Even if you demo the driver in the store, get great results on THEIR launch monitor, and have a coupon code to save you some coin,  you have not optimized your performance. First thing you need to do is read this article in MyGolfSpy on what is really in driver shafts.  Chris actually interviewed me for this article (pays to be in the biz for 20 years) and really did a thorough job uncovering every aspect of what goes on in the golf industry in terms of shaft quality and legitimacy. Shafts Need to Be Profiled First. For the reasons Chris points out in his article, we always use aftermarket, legitimate shafts and profile them extensively before using them in our build process.  (See our blog on profiling shafts here).  In fact, if you want more proof of the quality of the shaft in your new club, we have one of our partners, ACCRA Golf that will send us a certificate from their profiling system.  We may do that in the future but we have issues with the proprietary nature of our data. Clubs... Read More

How to Get More Distance With Your Driver

November 16th, 2017

How to Get More Distance With Your Driver. I did a series of blog posts about lowering your scores by getting more distance off the tee a while ago.  This topic is even more relevant today.  More distance off the tee means shorter approach shots which means lower scores. While we are all about distance, accuracy and consistency, NOBODY wants to necessarily LOSE distance off the tee.  With all of the new technology focused on BALL SPEED, that ball speed is created by hitting the ball on the sweet spot.  Our BGF fitting system and TrueFitClubs Fitting Wizard will help you find that sweet spot by getting you the correct length, shaft weight, shaft flex, swing weight,  launch(trajectory) and spin profile in your driver shaft.  For more details….read on! #1 – Find the Sweet Spot (See Intro to this Series here…) We all know that the sweet spot on your driver is right in the middle, right?  Wrong.  If you really want to optimize and increase distance you have to find the spot on your driver that gives you the highest ball speed for your swing speed, reduces spin and gives you the correct launch angle.  In this discussion, we... Read More

Give Your Golf Bag an Extreme Makeover

November 6th, 2017

I know, I know.  Extreme Makeover is older that dirt now, but at some point you may want to give your golf bag an extreme makeover.  C’mon…with 14 clubs in your bag they are not ALL helping you are they?  Some of you are very analytical and keep track of every stat possible.  Others are more intuitive and just know that certain clubs in their bags are not working consistently.  So either way, let’s take a look at where to start. Driver Have you lost distance in the past couple of years?  Did you switch to a new driver and accuracy and consistency are suffering?  Everyone has jumped on the “HOT” driver bandwagon and there is a new one every year it seems.  Fact is, EVERY manufacturer makes a really hot driver.  EPIC, M2, G400, EX10…you name it.  The trick is to get the right shaft (accuracy, consistency) and the right loft (distance) to get you the best performance. Fairway Woods Of all the golfers we fit, fairway woods are on top of the list of clubs that cause the most problems.  Do you hit your fairway woods thin or fat?  Hooking your fairway shots into the woods?  That is... Read More

The Best Golf Club Fitting System

October 26th, 2017

The best golf club fitting system will recommend the proper length of club, shaft weight, shaft flex, shaft trajectory, shaft spin and swing weight for every club in your bag.  If you have been through a fitting and these club characteristics were not specifically detailed, your fitter is just guessing at what will work for you. We believe that our BGF (Better Golf…Faster) Fitting System is the most accurate and reliable fitting system in use today.  The system was first developed in 2005 and has been used to fit well over 20,000 golfers around the world.  The unique part of this fitting system is that it takes into account four different aspects that all work together to create a proper fitting recommendation:  Physical Characteristics (height, weight, wrist-crease-to-floor), Swing Dynamics (tempo, transition and release point), Strength (distance for 6 iron and driver) and Shot Tendencies (height and direction). Recommendations for Every Golfer Using these swing and shot measurements, the BGF Fitting System will make recommendations for golfers of all ages and physical abilities.  We have used BGF to fit golfers from 8 to 92 years old with swing speeds from 45 to 145 mph with a driver!  We have made modifications over... Read More

Should YOU Play Graphite or Steel Shafts in Your Irons?

October 19th, 2017

Should YOU play graphite or steel shafts in your irons?  Seems like we get asked that question in every iron fitting.  With 39% of our golfers saying they are looking for new irons this year, I thought I would answer that question with a couple of our fitting principles. First of all, shaft weight is one of the most important factors in fitting irons.  I don’t care if you are “getting older” or not!  The shaft weight has to help you optimize your consistency, distance and accuracy. The lines are REALLY blurring these days between steel and graphite iron shaft weights, especially in the 95 to 110 gram weight.  That weight class is were a lot of golfers either move from steel to graphite, or as juniors get stronger, move from graphite to steel.  As a point of reference, traditional Dynamic Gold S300 shafts weigh roughly 130 grams, KBS Tour around 125, and Project X LZ Steel  from 110-125.  All steel shaft manufacturers have made lighter weight models, i.e. the KBS Tour 90, True Temper XP 95 to offer lighter shaft options.  Nippon makes their MODUS3 shafts in weights from 105 – 130.  The numbers on the shaft typically represent the gram weight of... Read More